Our Academics on YouTube

School YouTube Channel

UNSW Mathematics and Statistics has its own YouTube channel - subscribe to keep up to date with the latest content. We post a range of videos, including those with course-specific material.

Find us at: https://www.youtube.com/user/MathsStatsUNSW

Staff YouTube channels

We also have several members of staff who are using YouTube to enhance their teaching, and as an alternative to more traditional methods of communication. The videos available on the YouTube channels below range from worked examples from the undergraduate syllabus to sometimes controversial lectures on the history, foundations and philosophy of science and mathematics. The makers of these videos would welcome your feedback, which can be provided via YouTube.

Note that although UNSW has provided support to produce some of these videos, they are personal presentations by the staff members involved. The views expressed and the content presented in these videos are the personal views of the authors and are not necessarily endorsed by the School of Mathematics and Statistics. Students in particular should note that any instructional videos on these channels are not necessarily appropriate in level or method for the particular course they are enrolled in. If in doubt, please ask your course lecturer.

Chris Tisdell's YouTube channel has attracted
tens of millions of views.  

Some of his playlist topics include Differential
Equations, Introduction to Complex Numbers,
Introduction to Vectors and Calculus for Beginners. 

In 2010, Dr Tisdell became the first Australian (in
any field) to be made an official “YouTube Partner
in Education (Australia)”. 

Norman Wildberger's YouTube channel has over
60,000 subscribers. 

He has a range of playlists which include videos on
Math Foundations, Math History, and Universal Hyperbolic
Geometry, among others. 

A/Prof Wildberger was selected as an official
"YouTube Partner in Education (Australia)" in 2011.    

Daniel Chan's YouTube channel looks at a variety
of university and research level mathematics.

He has playlists on Category Theory, Projective
Geometry and Point Set Topology, among others. 

Denis Potapov's YouTube channel contains an
assortment of mathematical demonstrations,
including videos on isometrical transformations
of spherical triangles, and pendulum waves simulation.

He also has an Advanced Maths Lecture series.
                                         
Randell Heyman's YouTube channel features animated
videos to explain interesting mathematics, and his range
of videos aim to assist a broad range of people, including
students, to understand the language of mathematics.