Shane Keating receives U21 Global Education Enhancement Fund Award

Date: 

Tuesday, 23rd June 2020


Shane Keating Congratulations to Dr Shane Keating, who has won a Universitas 21 Global Education Fund award to develop online teaching resources in ocean, weather, and climate science. 

The award will be used to develop innovative web and cloud-based interactive labs for students around the U21 network and globally. 

Dr Keating will lead the project "Climate in the Cloud: Web-enabled cloud-computing educational resources for climate, atmosphere, and ocean science", partnering with Dr Bishak Gayen of the University of Melbourne.

“For undergraduate and postgraduate university students studying the ocean, weather, and the climate system - some of whom are among those most impacted by extreme weather in a changing climate - there are few opportunities to engage with research-quality climate model output,” Dr Keating said.

“We want to solve this by creating online labs that are freely available to educators and students via cloud-storage and cloud-computing services.”

Their project aims to address this imbalance by harnessing the U21 network of world-leading research universities in the field of climate science and innovative cloud-computing technology to make climate, ocean, and weather model data freely available to students around the world. The data will be accompanied by a comprehensive suite of pedagogical labs and teaching materials that can be integrated within existing university level courses in climate, atmosphere, and ocean science. The project is a partnership with the Dedalus Project, an open source software project for fluid dynamics.

Thirteen U21 members from ten countries, working in partnerships, have all been awarded funds to carry out work on better and robust solutions for online teaching, learning and assessment which can be shared as resources within the U21 network within the next twelve months.

UNSW Science also secured a second successful project, led by staff in the School of Chemistry. 

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