Full Seminar Archive

Our regular seminar program covers a broad range of topics from applied mathematics, pure mathematics and statistics. All staff and students are welcome. This page has a complete list of past seminars and a list restricted by year can be accessed via the left-hand menu.

Dr Matthew Schofield - University of Otago
Genetic maps are usually the starting point for many types of genetic analysis. They are one-dimensional representations of genetic inheritance across a chromosome. Genetic maps frequency are...

Professor Giles Hooker - ANU
This talk develops methods of statistical inference based around ensembles of decision trees: bagging, random forests, and boosting. Recent results have shown that when the bootstrap procedure in...

James Thorson - National Marine Fisheries Service
Societal responses to COVID-19 have illustrated the great public value of accurate epidemiological forecasts; climate change has a similar potential to upend commerce and necessitates accurate...

Pavel Krivitsky - UNSW Sydney
Joint modelling of large samples of networks collected from similar settings—classrooms, households, etc.—has a long history, with a variety of methods available to pool information in model...

Prof. Melanie Bell - University of Arizona
Cluster randomized trials (CRTs) are studies where groups of people, rather than individuals, are randomly allocated to intervention or control. While these type of designs can be appropriate and...

A/Prof. Pierre Lafaye de Micheaux - UNSW Sydney
John W. Tukey (1975) defined statistical data depth as a function that determines the centrality of an arbitrary point with respect to a data cloud or to a probability measure. During the last...

Prof. Benoit Liquet - University of Pau et Pays de L'Adour
Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) focus on testing association between millions of genetic markers (or single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs) and a phenotype in an agnostic way, where every SNP...

Alexander Ly - University of Amsterdam
For many years statisticians (e.g., Berkson 1942; Wasserstein & Lazar 2016) have warned applied scientists of the dangers of the mechanistic use of p-values as a license for making a claim of a...

Prof. Sidney Resnick - Cornell University
We review a framework for assessing dependence in multivariate data that could plausibly come from a multivariate power law. The framework is allows multiple (even infinite) heavy tail regimes...

Dr. Simone Padoan - Bocconi University
 Expectiles define a least squares analogue of quantiles which have later received substantial attention in actuarial and financial risk management contexts. Unlike quantiles, expectiles define...

Pages