Coming Seminars

Our regular seminar program covers a broad range of topics from applied mathematics, pure mathematics and statistics. All welcome, especially students. A complete list of past seminars can be accessed via the left-hand menu.

Emily Peters
Maybe you've heard of diagram algebras, planar algebras, "spiders" or something similar. And you're wondering, is this really math? Are the pictures an analogy or are they actual mathematical objects? Happily, there are rigorous mathematical...

Prof Tak Kuen Siu
In this talk, we shall discuss a self-exciting threshold jump-diffusion model for option valuation. This model incorporates regime switches without introducing an exogenous stochastic factor process. A generalized version of the Esscher transform is...

Lia Vas
I have been working in algebra and ring theory, in particular with rings of operators, involutive rings, Baer *-rings and Leavitt path algebras. These rings were introduced in order to simplify the study of sometimes rather cumbersome operator...

Dr Jim Pettigrew
In this talk I will outline (some) contemporary research tackling the questions of equity, access and disadvantage in mathematics education. I will also reflect on my experience in supporting the mathematical learning of students at Western Sydney...

Peter Tingley
We present an elementary construction of Lusztig's canonical basis. The method, which is essentially Lusztig's original approach, uses the braid group to reduce to rank two calculations. Some of the wonderful properties of the canonical basis are...

Gurvan Madec
Strong winds associated to Tropical Cyclones (TCs) trigger intense mixing in the upper ocean. While the resulting surface cooling feeds back negatively on TCs intensity, the associated sub-surface warming has been suggested to substantially modify...

Dr Di Warren
While a first year Stats course has the potential to be extremely interesting and relevant, students often report the exact opposite, especially in large compulsory service courses. In order to motivate students, we have introduced a greater...

Catherine Greenhill
The small subgraph conditioning method was introduced by Robinson and Wormald (1992, 1994) to prove that a random $r$-regular graph contains a Hamilton cycle with probability which tends to 1 as the number of vertices tends to infinity, so long as...